WOMEN WITH PTSD UNITED INFORMATION . RESOURCES . SUPPORT
FOR WOMEN WITH PTSD
EMAIL info@womenwithptsdunited.org

Menu Sleep Issues and PTSD - Continued Sleep Issues and PTSD - Continued Sleep Issues and PTSD - Continued

Anger
Anxiety & Panic Attacks
Depression
Dissociation & DID
Find or Start a Local Group
Flashbacks
Grounding Techniques & Relaxation
Hotlines & Resources
Mania & PTSD
Mission & Purpose
Narcissism & Gaslighting
PTSD & The Workplace
PTSD & Holidays (Coping with Events)
Self-Care & PTSD
Self-Confidence & PTSD
Self-Harm & Alternatives
Service Animals
Sleep Issues & PTSD
Terms, Policy & Privacy
Triggers
Women w PTSD United ™ Support Group
Worksheets & Journal Page


On Facebook: Women with PTSD
United ™ - Support Group

Closed & Confidential
Become a Member



Help Us Help More Women
by Supporting The Cause

Tax Deductible Donation

    other sounds that help us sleep. Some people need to sleep in complete silence; while on the other hand, some need a little background noise.

    For many (myself included), the dripping of the faucet, the hum of electricity, the sound of themselves breathing, or the blankets rustling as they toss and turn stresses them out and keeps them awake. So what's the deal?

    Technically speaking, white noise is a consistent noise that comes out evenly across all hearable frequencies. When you get jarred awake or bothered by a noise at night, it's not really the noise itself, but the abrupt inconsistency in the noise that you hear. The fact of the matter is you still hear when you sleep, and white noise can mask those inconsistencies. The scientific aspect set aside, it's just plain soothing, filling out the silence that makes you feel trapped with racing thoughts or excess energy. There are even white noise machines that can be purchased for specifically this purpose.

  • Create an environment in which you feel safe. While the bedroom is optimal, it may not be possible to rest there for reasons specific to each person (e.g. if you experienced violence in that room or a similar room). It may also help to have a friend or family member stay in the room, or perhaps in a nearby room, while you are sleeping.

  • Use Aromatherapy. Aromatherapy has a number of different uses, but is perhaps used most often for relaxing or creating a sense of drowsiness. Numerous studies have resulted in science giving a nod to the validity of aromatherapy. The essential oil of lavender (not fragrance oil!) can be added to your nightly bath to relax and calm you, or you can simply open the bottle and inhale a bit of it right before bedtime. It helps gently ease stress and relax.

    If you find yourself having a hard time drifting off at night, try making a lavender sleep sachet to stash under your pillow, or on a bedside table, to help you relax and drift off. Apply essential oil of lavender to your pillow, or spritz some on your bedding occasionally.

Personal Habits

  • Exercise early in the day, and on a regular basis. Studies find moderate aerobic activity can improve insomniacs' sleep quality, as well as give you more energy when you're awake. For best results, exercise at least three hours before bedtime so the body has sufficient time to wind down before hitting the sack. (Having sex or masturbating before bed can help you fall asleep as well.)

  • Do some leg exercises. We know we told you not to exercise before bed. But, apparently, some easy leg lifts, squats, or your leg exercise of choice can help divert blood flow to the legs and away from the brain. This can help quiet the mind, making it easier to slip into dreamland.
  • Bathe or shower before bed. Stepping from warm water into that pre-cooled bedroom will cause body temperatures to drop slightly, which can trigger sleepy feelings by slowing down metabolic activity.

    A soothing and relaxing Epsom Salt bath works magic (another option: to obtain Magnesium, if you prefer not to supplement). Add a few drops of your favorite essential oil (lavender is great) to get the soothing benefits of aromatherapy as well. Light some candles, and turn on some relaxing music.

  • Schedule "worry time" during the day. Spend 15 minutes during the day addressing problems (journaling is a good way to start) so they don't sneak up when your head hits the pillow. If a particular event or stressor is keeping you up at night, and it has a clear end date, the problem may resolve itself naturally.

  • Vent stresses. If designated worry time earlier in the day didn't fully do the trick, spend some extra time writing down anxieties before bed. Loose-leaf paper works, but if you scrawl your sorrows in a journal or notebook, you can literally "close the book" on your worries, at least until morning.

  • Limit caffeine. It's tempting to reach for coffee when we're tired after a poor night's sleep. But drinking caffeine can make it harder for us to fall asleep at night, creating a vicious cycle. Can't quit cold turkey? Try limiting caffeine intake to earlier in the day so it's out of your system by bedtime.

  • Nap the right way. Just 10-20 minutes of napping during the day can help us feel rested, improve our creativity, and memory. But try to avoid napping after 3-4:00PM, as this can make it harder to fall asleep at bedtime.

Continue Reading Sleep Issues: Page 3

Copyright © 2017 . Women With PTSD United ™ . All Rights Reserved . Address: Women With PTSD United ™ . 14130 Homer Road, Concord, MI 49237 . Email . info@womenwithptsdunited.org
Anger . Anxiety & Panic Attacks . Depression . Dissociation & DID . Find or Start a Local Group . Flashbacks . Grounding Techniques & Relaxation . Hotlines & Resources
Mania & PTSD . Mission & Purpose . Narcissism & Gaslighting . PTSD & The Workplace . PTSD & Holidays (Coping with Events) . Self-Care & PTSD . Self-Confidence & PTSD
Self-Harm & Alternatives . Service Animals . Sleep Issues & PTSD . Terms, Policy & Privacy . Triggers . Worksheets & Journal Page
Women With PTSD United ™ website developed and donated by Witty1® Productions: Website design and promotion for higher visibility!