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You want to balance this, and insure that you are making yourself available, versus being overly persistent and aggressive.

If a woman has been put down, she may need to be encouraged to add input, acknowledging her input is valued.

Evaluate the effectiveness of the environment and the employee. If there are times that the employee is having a hard time, or tasks that are not up to standards, speak directly to that employee about how you can assist them.

Providing gentle and immediate feedback will allow the employee to determine what is needed to get the task back up to standards.

This is not to say that all substandard work is due to PTSD symptoms, but it is helpful to know the origins of the problem.

Provide training for coworkers and supervisors. By providing training on PTSD and related symptoms, the other staff members can also be educated on how to help the individual.

Sensitivity training may be needed on topics that are related to PTSD.

The Legal Information and Rights of Those with PTSD Regarding Employment

The Americans with Disabilities Act prohibits discrimination against qualified employees or job applicants on the basis of their disability. It covers all employment practices, including the job application process, hiring, advancement, compensation, training, firing, and all other conditions of employment.

Under the ADA, employers cannot use eligibility standards or qualifications that unfairly screen out people with disabilities, and cannot make speculative assumptions about a person's ability to do a job based on myths, fears, or stereotypes about employees with disabilities (such as unfounded concerns that hiring people with disabilities would mean increased insurance costs or excessive absenteeism).

Additionally, employers must make "reasonable accommodations" for employees with disabilities, which means changing the work environment or job duties to eliminate barriers that keep an individual from being able to perform the essential functions of the job.

Employers are not, however, required to make accommodations that would result in an "undue hardship", which means accommodations that would result in significant difficulty or expense.

Also, employers are not required to provide accommodations unless an employee requests them.

So, if you're a veteran with a hidden disability like PTSD, you can decide whether to reveal the disability and request accommodations.

If you don't need accommodations, you don't have to disclose the disability. Employers with fifteen or more employees must comply with these provisions.

Typical Examples of
Reasonable Accommodations

Flexible scheduling at a retail store or restaurant, so a sales clerk or cashier with PTSD can attend counseling sessions, or an employee with a spinal cord injury who has a lengthy personal care routine in the mornings can start his or her workday later.

Reducing clutter and distractions, providing instructions and information in writing, breaking down complex assignments into small steps, or allowing a job coach on the worksite to help a new employee get settled into the job.

Specialized equipment for a data-entry operator who has lost an arm, hand, or finger, such as a one-handed keyboard, a large-key keyboard, a touchpad, a trackball, or speech recognition software.

Making sure materials and equipment are in easy reach for a factory worker who uses a wheelchair.

Raising an office desk on blocks for a worker who uses a wheelchair, and making sure supplies, materials, and office machines are at a height that is easy to reach and use, and are in a location that is not obstructed by partitions, wastebaskets, or other items.


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